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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Now displaying: September, 2018
Sep 26, 2018
Dr. Brian Im is the medical director for the NYU Rusk brain injury rehabilitation program and program director for the ACGME accredited brain injury medicine fellowship at NYU School of Medicine. He is heavily involved in program development and academic medicine. He has an active role in TBI research with a focus on studying health care disparities and differences that exist in traumatic brain injury care for different populations. In this interview, Dr. Im discusses some of the medical complexities associated with complex TBI. After completing medical school at SUNY, Syracuse, a rehabilitation residency at NYU School of Medicine/Rusk Rehabilitation, and a fellowship in brain injury medicine at UMDNJ/Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, his subsequent tenure at Bellevue Hospital focused upon an interest in improving brain injury rehabilitation for underserved populations.
 
In Part 1, we discussed: an October 20-21, 2018 program at Rusk on the topic of complex TBI rehabilitation, paths that patients take to arrive at Rusk for treatment, measures used to determine recovery, whether treatment plateaus are reached, and differences in how patients experience a TBI and living with its aftermath.
 
 

 

Sep 19, 2018

Until this interview, this podcast series has focused on healthcare professionals and researchers and the myriad activities in which they all engage. We are very excited that, for this interview, listeners have an opportunity to hear the views of an individual who was on the other side. Mr. Pierre Lucien is an individual who had both legs amputated above the knee. In 2008, while on a training run with the Atlanta, Georgia Police Department, he fell to the ground unconscious when he experienced massive organ failure. In an effort to save his life, doctors had to amputate both of his legs above the knees. He later was transferred to the Rusk Rehabilitation Institute at NYU Langone where he underwent additional surgery and began rehabilitation. Today, he is married and the father of two children and earns a living while employed at a police department in Marietta, Georgia. The interview with him consists of three parts.

In Part 3 we discussed: experience of phantom pain in missing limbs and how to treat it; a sensation of feeling the presence of missing limbs; what he does to stay physically active; his family life and what he does for a living; providing assistance to new patients who undergo an amputation; additional activities in which he is engaged to inspire other individuals to cope with life’s challenges successfully; and thoughts or recommendations important to convey to health professionals.

 

Sep 12, 2018

Until today, this podcast series has focused on healthcare professionals and researchers and the myriad activities in which they all engage. We are very excited that, for this interview, listeners have an opportunity to hear the views of an individual who was on the other side. Mr. Pierre Lucien is an individual who had both legs amputated above the knee. In 2008, while on a training run with the Atlanta, Georgia Police Department, he fell to the ground unconscious when he experienced massive organ failure. In an effort to save his life, doctors had to amputate both of his legs above the knees. He later was transferred to the Rusk Rehabilitation Institute at NYU Langone where he underwent additional surgery and began rehabilitation. Today, he is married and the father of two children and earns a living while employed at a police department in Marietta, Georgia. The interview with him consists of three parts.

In Part 2 Pierre discusses: from the perspective of an amputee what is considered both a good day and a bad day; amount of time elapsed from time of surgery before prostheses were prescribed and use of them began; length of time to accommodate to having prosthetic limbs; kinds of problems that can develop when a prosthetic device exerts pressure on a limb’s soft tissue and how to deal with them; once prosthetics are fitted and used how much maintenance of them is involved; and adjustments in prostheses necessary to carry anything heavy or in trying to navigate uneven ground or a flight of stairs and the kinds of challenges involved, such as feeling a loss of balance. 

 

Sep 5, 2018

Until today, this podcast series has focused on healthcare professionals and researchers and the myriad activities in which they all engage. We are very excited that, for this interview, listeners have an opportunity to hear the views of an individual who was on the other side. Mr. Pierre Lucien is an individual who had both legs amputated above the knee. In 2008, while on a training run with the Atlanta, Georgia Police Department, he fell to the ground unconscious when he experienced massive organ failure. In an effort to save his life, doctors had to amputate both of his legs above the knees. He later was transferred to the Rusk Rehabilitation Institute at NYU Langone where he underwent additional surgery and began rehabilitation. Today, he is married and the father of two children and earns a living while employed at a police department in Marietta, Georgia. The interview with him consists of three parts.

In Part 1 we discussed: if there had been any signs or symptoms prior to his collapse and loss of consciousness; where he obtained treatment; his age when his legs were amputated; length of time as both an inpatient and an outpatient; time elapsed from time of surgery to rehabilitation; kinds of health and other kinds of professionals who provided care; amputation as a life changing event;  adjustments that had to be made in various aspects of daily living and functioning; and for a single person who experienced amputation, how dating was affected.

 

 

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