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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Now displaying: May, 2019
May 29, 2019

Joan Gold is a clinical professor in the Department of Rehabilitation at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. Her areas of specialization include the pediatric disorders cerebral palsy, and spina bifida. In her own words, she stated that she has had the pleasure of watching her patients and learning from their strengths for 45+ years. Her medical degree is from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the NYU Medical Center and her residency in pediatrics at Beth Israel Medical Center. She is board-certified in the following three areas: Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and also Pediatrics. 

This is the first of a two-part series. In Part 1, Dr. Gold discusses: number of adults in the U.S. with cerebral palsy; their life expectancy; challenges involved in the transition from pediatric to adult care for these patients; kinds of health problems adult patients experience; treatment for dystonia; the impact of additional physical deterioration on quality of life and mental health; and the ability to participate in physical activities, work, family, and recreational activities.

In Part 2, she discusses: pregnancy among patients with cerebral palsy, effect of pregnancy on balance and coordination if a motor functional impairment exists; challenges and resources available for patients who become parents; identification of the felt needs of patients; improvements needed in diagnosis and treatment; time period for adoption of rehabilitation treatment innovations; and key topics in rehabilitation research.

 

 

 
 
 

 

May 15, 2019

Dr. Joel Stein is Physiatrist-in-Chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, as well as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. His clinical and research interests are in the area of stroke rehabilitation. He has had a particular focus on the use of exercise as a treatment, and on the use of robotic and other technologies to facilitate recovery of motor function after stroke. He has authored or co-authored two books on stroke recovery and rehabilitation for stroke survivors and their families, and edited a multi-authored medical textbook on this subject entitled “Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation.” His undergraduate degree is from Columbia University and his medical degree is from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, followed by a residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He is board certified in both internal medicine and physical medicine & rehabilitation.

This is part 2 of a 2-part series. In this episode, Dr. Stein discusses: measures to predict neurological recovery and stages when they are applied most effectively; periods of time when most rehabilitations interventions take place; success of efforts to achieve the translation of clinical findings and evidence-based research to the bedside in a timely manner; and many other exciting topics.  

 
 
 
 
 

 

May 1, 2019

Dr. Joel Stein is Physiatrist-in-Chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, as well as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. His clinical and research interests are in the area of stroke rehabilitation. He has had a particular focus on the use of exercise as a treatment, and on the use of robotic and other technologies to facilitate recovery of motor function after stroke. He has authored or co-authored two books on stroke recovery and rehabilitation for stroke survivors and their families, and edited a multi-authored medical textbook on this subject entitled “Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation.” His undergraduate degree is from Columbia University and his medical degree is from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, followed by a residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He is board certified in both internal medicine and physical medicine & rehabilitation.

This is part 1 of a 2-part series. In this part of the discussion, Dr. Stein discusses: estimates of stroke incidence and prevalence in the U.S.; stroke occurrence among young individuals; impairments commonly resulting from a stroke; factors such as age that can affect the degree and speed of recovery; sleep apnea as a possible risk factor for stroke; relationship between sleep disorders and stroke recovery and possible contributions to cognitive decline post-stroke; whether screening for post-stroke depression and cognitive impairment can predict long-term patient outcomes; and whether persistent symptoms of anxiety can develop after a stroke.

 

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