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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Now displaying: December, 2017
Dec 27, 2017

Dr. Kristine Josef is a Neurologic Clinical Specialist with experience working in various areas including adult inpatient rehabilitation and acute care. While working in acute care, she was involved in the Early Mobility project in the intensive care unit that resulted in patient decreased length of stay, decreased hospital costs, and increased incidence of patient discharge home vs post-acute facilities. She has given multiple presentations on the topic of delirium. Recently, she co-authored a poster that was presented at the 2017 Combined Sections Meeting in San Antonio, TX that was titled “Delirium in patients with cerebrovascular accident: increasing treatment team awareness.” Her doctorate in physical therapy is from the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, which now is Rutgers University. She is a board certified neurologic clinical specialist through the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties.

In this interview, she discusses: distinguishing delirium from encephalopathy; tools for accurate delirium screening and diagnosis in critically ill patients; the role physical therapy plays in dealing with the problem of patients with delirium from the standpoint of diagnosis and treatment; if anything can be done pre-surgically to prevent the occurrence of delirium; aging and co-morbidities in relation to delirium; the role of family members in changing the course of delirium in a patient; and the advantages and disadvantages of using physical restraints to manage behavioral symptoms of hospitalized patients.

 

 

Dec 20, 2017
Nettie Capasso is an inpatient occupational therapy supervisor at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Medical Center. She has presented at national and international conferences including the American Occupational Therapy Association, the International Seating Symposium, and the Rehabilitation and the Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America. She was a co-investigator for the Impact of Stroke prevention Education in Changing Stroke Risk Behaviors research study at Rusk from 2005-2009.  Her publications include Optimizing motor planning and performance for individuals with neurological disorders, in the 7th edition of the textbook, Occupational Therapy for Physical Dysfunction. She is certified in both the Neuro-Integrative Functional Rehabilitation And Habilitation treatment, and the A-ONE assessment of cognitive/perceptual impairment in adults with brain injury. Holder of a Master’s degree in Occupational Therapy from New York University, her Bachelor’s degree in Clinical Nutrition is from Hunter College, City University of New York.
 
In this interview, she discusses an update on an earlier study called the Development and Preliminary Reliability of the Functional Upper Extremity Levels (FUEL) that is useful in treating stroke patients regarding the tool's reliability and validity, educational approaches to change stroke risk behaviors, the role of neurofeedback therapy for stroke/brain injury patients, the role of occupational therapy in addressing needs of stroke patients who want to continue being employed, and how to prioritize other needs of stroke patients, such as self-care and wanting to fulfill social roles with family members.
Dec 14, 2017
Dr. Dallas Kingsbury is accredited in sports medicine by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education as an instructor in the Rusk Rehabilitation department at NYU Langone Medical Center. He has an interest in interventional sports and regenerative medicine and has had the unique experience of working with the performing arts, aerial acrobatics, and flying trapeze communities. It also is worth mentioning that he is particular adept himself as a man in the flying trapeze. Dr. Kingsbury combines his interest in treating patients with an involvement in clinical research pertaining to osteoarthritis, knee injections, and the treatment of chronic tendon problems. His medical degree is from the University of Medicine & Dentistry and he did his residency at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Rehabilitation Medicine.
 
In this interview, Dr. Kingsbury discusses the kinds of patients he treats for musculoskeletal conditions, reasons for patient delays in seeking​ treatment, patient resilience and willingness to participate actively in all aspects of rehabilitation, role of being overweight plays in onset of musculoskeletal health problems, how outcomes are affected by time between occurrence of injury and provision of treatment, smartphone usage as a cause of musculoskeletal problems, and translation of clinical research to bed site care.
Dec 6, 2017

Kaitlin Hanley works as a speech-language pathologist in acute care and Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Medical Center and Christina Marino is an occupational therapist who works on that same unit. Kaitlin has cross-covered acute care and acute rehabilitation for her entire career with a focus on functional therapy for enabling patients to return to the community as it pertains to cognitive, speech, and language therapy. She completed her graduate work in Speech Language Pathology at MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. Christina has worked in a variety of settings, including Rusk and the Tisch Hospital acute care service at NYU Langone. Along with treating cardiopulmonary patients with cognitive deficits, another specialty includes working with limb loss patients. Her undergraduate and graduate degrees are from the University of Scranton.

In this interview, Kaitlin and Christina discuss the kinds of patients they treat and problems regarding how cognitive impairments affect cardiopulmonary patients; occupational therapy and speech-language pathology tools available to arrive at an accurate diagnosis; factors  involved in making a determination of which types of interventions would be most appropriate for patients who may differ by age, frailty, and extent of their problems; activities that are aimed at preventing a recurrence of problems; and areas where further research might provide guidance for making additional improvements in patient care.

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