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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Now displaying: March, 2021
Mar 31, 2021

Dr. Mahya Beheshti is a physician scientist at NYU Langone Health’s Rusk Rehabilitation Institute. She has been working at the Visuomotor Integration Laboratory with the focus on eye-hand coordination research as it relates to acquired brain injury. She also collaborates with  the Rehabilitation Engineering Alliance and Center Transforming Low Vision Laboratory where her research involves advanced wearables for sensory deprived patients. Additionally, she is a Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering PhD student at NYU-Tandon.

Dr. J.R. Rizzo also is a physician scientist at NYU Langone Health’s Rusk Rehabilitation Institute. He serves as Director of Innovation and Technology for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with cross-appointments in the Department of Neurology and the Departments of Biomedical & Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at NYU-Tandon. He also is the Associate Director of Healthcare for the renowned NYU Wireless Laboratory in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NYU-Tandon. He leads both the Visuomotor Integration Laboratory and the Rehabilitation Engineering Alliance and Center Transforming Low Vision Laboratory.

This is a two-part series. In Part 1, they discuss: how the ability to conduct research has been affected by the arrival of the coronavirus pandemic; possible reluctance of patients to be involved in research that occurs in a clinical setting because of a fear of contracting COVID-19 there; the extent to which delays and postponements have occurred because of disease resurgences; how COVID-19 limitations on touch and physical contact have led to unintended yet significant challenges to spatial perception, interpretation, and behavior for individuals who are blind or visually impaired;  the effectiveness of gloves, hand sanitizers, and hand washing in reducing the risk of touching contaminated surfaces and what, if any downsides, would be associated with such practices; and how the the Visually Impaired Smart Service System for Spatial Intelligence and Onboard Navigation operates. 
 
In Part 2, they discuss: research involving advanced wearables for sensory deprived patients; the use of other kinds of suitable assistive technology devices; the role of the cerebellum and the cortex regarding critical aspects of functional movement control; the results of a study to determine if native English speakers perform differently compared to non-native English speakers on a sideline-focused rapid number naming task and to characterize objective differences in eye movement behavior between these cohorts; the role of the long white cane as a mobility tool for individuals who have visual impairments and any shortcomings this assistive instrument may have; and any other current research not discussed in this interview, along with any projected vision research at NYU. 
 

 

Mar 17, 2021

Dr. Robert Gordon is the Director of Intern Training and Associate Director of Postdoctoral Fellow Training at Rusk Rehabilitation Institute and Clinical Associate Professor at New York University Grossman School of Medicine. He has been the Director of Intern Training since 1995 and has trained over 270 psychology interns. He has specialties in the areas of neuropsychological and forensic testing and psychotherapy with children and adults with physical and learning disabilities and chronic illness. He has published in the areas of existential-humanistic and relational therapeutic approaches during COVID-19 with patients with preexisting conditions, ethics, supervision, relational psychoanalysis, dream interpretation, pain management, and the use of projective testing in neuropsychology. He received his doctorate from the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University in Child Clinical/School Psychology in 1985 and a Certificate in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy from Adelphi University in 1999. 

This is a two part series. In Part 1, he discusses: his role at Rusk and the services his department provides and with what populations; the extent to which telehealth was used prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and how this usage compares to the aftermath of the appearance of this disease; what motivated him to write a recent article entitled “Existential-Humanistic and Relational Approaches During COVID with Patients with Preexisting Medical Conditions;” his description of the meaning of the term Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy; who some major writers are in the field of Existential-Humanistic Therapy and how their ideas are relevant to dealing with COVID; some psychological challenges of dealing with COVID; and what constitutes relational psychotherapy and what major ideas there are in this approach.

In Part 2, he discusses: some major techniques in applying Existential-Humanistic and Relational approaches with patients with preexisting medical conditions; what Posttraumatic Growth is and what strategies are used in exploring it in psychotherapy; major issues that patients with preexisting issues experience; kinds of therapeutic adjustments that must be made in treating patients with communication impairments; the nature of group work with patients and determining when it is advantageous to use it; and some implications of the paper he wrote regarding clinical practice and  society in general.

Mar 3, 2021

Dr. Robert Gordon is the Director of Intern Training and Associate Director of Postdoctoral Fellow Training at Rusk Rehabilitation Institute and Clinical Associate Professor at New York University Grossman School of Medicine. He has been the Director of Intern Training since 1995 and has trained over 270 psychology interns. He has specialties in the areas of neuropsychological and forensic testing and psychotherapy with children and adults with physical and learning disabilities and chronic illness. He has published in the areas of existential-humanistic and relational therapeutic approaches during COVID-19 with patients with preexisting conditions, ethics, supervision, relational psychoanalysis, dream interpretation, pain management, and the use of projective testing in neuropsychology. He received his doctorate from the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University in Child Clinical/School Psychology in 1985 and a Certificate in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy from Adelphi University in 1999. 

This is a two part series. In Part 1, he discusses: his role at Rusk and the services his department provides and with what populations; the extent to which telehealth was used prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and how this usage compares to the aftermath of the appearance of this disease; what motivated him to write a recent article entitled “Existential-Humanistic and Relational Approaches During COVID with Patients with Preexisting Medical Conditions;” his description of the meaning of the term Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy; who some major writers are in the field of Existential-Humanistic Therapy and how their ideas are relevant to dealing with COVID; some psychological challenges of dealing with COVID; and what constitutes relational psychotherapy and what major ideas there are in this approach.

In Part 2, he discusses: some major techniques in applying Existential-Humanistic and Relational approaches with patients with preexisting medical conditions; what Posttraumatic Growth is and what strategies are used in exploring it in psychotherapy; major issues that patients with preexisting issues experience; kinds of therapeutic adjustments that must be made in treating patients with communication impairments; the nature of group work with patients and determining when it is advantageous to use it; and some implications of the paper he wrote regarding clinical practice and  society in general.

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