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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Now displaying: 2021
Feb 17, 2021

Dr. Joan Gold is a clinical professor in the Department of Rehabilitation at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. Her medical degree is from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the NYU Medical Center and her residency in pediatrics at Beth Israel Medical Center. She is board certified in the following three areas: Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and also in Pediatrics. Her area of specialization includes the pediatric disorders cerebral palsy and spina bifida.

This is a special two-part Grand Rounds series.

In Part 1 of her presentation, Dr. Gold contrasted a time 50 years ago when she made a presentation on the topic of spina bifida. Today, we have a change in attitude and a change in medical information since that earlier period and we also need to be aware of long-term care needs and the need for continuity of care of these patients, and all our patients who are aging out. She cited professional literature from 1971 that described many kinds of pediatric patients whose conditions were such that rather than try to treat them, they should be allowed to succumb. For example, comments made back then about these patients being incontinent and socially unacceptable were not true. By 1996, it was shown that most of the previous assumptions were wrong. A child in a wheelchair is worth living. Many surgical deformities that once were present can be corrected today. Incontinence is not inevitable and bowel function can be controlled. She discussed the role of folate in reducing the incidence of spina bifida. She mentioned the implications of providing care for these patients. Most of the surgical procedures undertaken today are neurosurgical. Various generalizations can be made. One is that adult spina bifida patients are likely to have fewer primary care visits than patients under the age of 18 and she explained reasons why it is so. She concluded Part 1 of her presentation by talking about the role that urinary complications may play in the death of many patients.

Listeners to Part 1 of Dr. Gold’s presentation will recall she indicated that it probably is the urinary complication that is the cause of death in most of these patients, which is critical. In Part 2, she began by asking what multilevel care elements should exist for patients with spina bifida? She mentioned that as a result of pushing wheelchairs, some patients experience rotator cuff injuries. Although therapeutic services do not have to be performed for all patients, she described some kinds of assistance that they may need. Some patients may experience functional regression. Once able to walk at ages five and 10, they no longer can do so. There is a higher incidence of neuroses. These patients need vocational, nutritional, and social work services. A problem for many patients is when they have to travel a considerable distance for hospital care, the facility they go to may lack the personnel necessary to provide appropriate kinds of spina bifida care. She indicated some surgical concerns. Most shunted patients have long term motor and cognitive behavioral deficits. She described urological issues that are most paramount and frequent. She asked what kinds of things should we do when we assess patients within a therapeutic realm? We should look at their transportation skills, perceptual motor skills to drive, be knowledgeable of their medical management and history, and try to establish some autonomy with money management, household skills, and community living skills. Also, there is a need to work on their parenting skills and on obtaining adequate health care for themselves and their children. There are issues with cardiovascular disease. Studies show that as many as 73% of spina bifida patients have chronic pain. A final portion of the presentation was on the topic of women with spina bifida giving birth.

Feb 3, 2021

Dr. Joan Gold is a clinical professor in the Department of Rehabilitation at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. Her medical degree is from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the NYU Medical Center and her residency in pediatrics at Beth Israel Medical Center. She is board certified in the following three areas: Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and also in Pediatrics. Her area of specialization includes the pediatric disorders cerebral palsy and spina bifida.

This is a special two-part Grand Rounds series.

In Part 1 of her presentation, Dr. Gold contrasted a time 50 years ago when she made a presentation on the topic of spina bifida. Today, we have a change in attitude and a change in medical information since that earlier period and we also need to be aware of long-term care needs and the need for continuity of care of these patients, and all our patients who are aging out. She cited professional literature from 1971 that described many kinds of pediatric patients whose conditions were such that rather than try to treat them, they should be allowed to succumb. For example, comments made back then about these patients being incontinent and socially unacceptable were not true. By 1996, it was shown that most of the previous assumptions were wrong. A child in a wheelchair is worth living. Many surgical deformities that once were present can be corrected today. Incontinence is not inevitable and bowel function can be controlled. She discussed the role of folate in reducing the incidence of spina bifida. She mentioned the implications of providing care for these patients. Most of the surgical procedures undertaken today are neurosurgical. Various generalizations can be made. One is that adult spina bifida patients are likely to have fewer primary care visits than patients under the age of 18 and she explained reasons why it is so. She concluded Part 1 of her presentation by talking about the role that urinary complications may play in the death of many patients.

Listeners to Part 1 of Dr. Gold’s presentation will recall she indicated that it probably is the urinary complication that is the cause of death in most of these patients, which is critical. In Part 2, she began by asking what multilevel care elements should exist for patients with spina bifida? She mentioned that as a result of pushing wheelchairs, some patients experience rotator cuff injuries. Although therapeutic services do not have to be performed for all patients, she described some kinds of assistance that they may need. Some patients may experience functional regression. Once able to walk at ages five and 10, they no longer can do so. There is a higher incidence of neuroses. These patients need vocational, nutritional, and social work services. A problem for many patients is when they have to travel a considerable distance for hospital care, the facility they go to may lack the personnel necessary to provide appropriate kinds of spina bifida care. She indicated some surgical concerns. Most shunted patients have long term motor and cognitive behavioral deficits. She described urological issues that are most paramount and frequent. She asked what kinds of things should we do when we assess patients within a therapeutic realm? We should look at their transportation skills, perceptual motor skills to drive, be knowledgeable of their medical management and history, and try to establish some autonomy with money management, household skills, and community living skills. Also, there is a need to work on their parenting skills and on obtaining adequate health care for themselves and their children. There are issues with cardiovascular disease. Studies show that as many as 73% of spina bifida patients have chronic pain. A final portion of the presentation was on the topic of women with spina bifida giving birth.

Jan 20, 2021
Holly Cohen is the Program Manager of the Assistive Technology Service at NYU Langone Health. Along with her clinical experience, she holds certification in assistive technology from the Rehabilitation and Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America, has a specialty certification in environmental modifications from the American Occupational Therapy Association, and is a Certified Driving Rehabilitation Specialist from the Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists. She founded the Assistive Technology Service and also started the Driving Rehabilitation program, serving as program manager of both services at NYU. She is an adjunct professor in the Department of the Occupational Therapy in the Steinhardt School at New York University. Her degree in Occupational Therapy is from the State University of New York and she has taken graduate level courses within the Interactive Telecommunications department at New York University. 
 
In this interview, she discusses how the coronavirus led to changes in how she works with patients, examples of low tech/high tech assistive devices, kinds of devices she uses most frequently, health problems of patients she treats, determining which forms of assistive technology to use, working with patients whose coronavirus symptoms persist, using telehealth to enable patients to use assistive devices at home, and helping patients to avoid abandoning the use of these devices.
 

 

Jan 6, 2021

Dr. Chelsea Schoen provides psychological and neuropsychological assessment and intervention services to a wide range of adults recovering from traumatic brain injury, stroke, other complex neurologic conditions, spinal cord injury, and orthopedic/musculoskeletal conditions. Her clinical and research interests include psychological factors associated with fear of falling. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology with a Health Emphasis and specialization in neuropsychology from the Yeshiva (Yeshiva) University.

Dr. Philip J. Uy is a Senior Psychologist at Rusk Rehabilitation and works at Cardiopulmonary/Medically Complex on the Main Campus and at the Neurorehabilitation (Langone Orthopedic Hospital) acute inpatient rehabilitation. His clinical and research interests are in neurologic disorders, cardiopulmonary conditions, and adjustment to medical disability. He also has expertise in substance use disorders. He obtained his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. 

In Part 1, they discuss the following: kinds of patients treated involving COVID-19; possible after-effects either caused or associated with the onset of coronavirus symptoms; types of challenges treating coronavirus patients;  mental health conditions that persist long-term; and mental health services provided for clinical colleagues.
 
In Part 2, they discuss the following: work involving telehealth care of patients; Acceptance and Commitment Therapy;  sleep disturbance or disorders experienced by patients; kinds of coronavirus patients at an increased risk for emotional disorders; and topics where more research could prove to be advantageous in improving patient care.

 

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