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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Jul 10, 2019

Dr. Olesya Yevdayev is a Senior Physical Therapist in the Outpatient Physical Therapy Department at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. She has a Bachelor of Science degree from Touro College and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Hunter College. She earned her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Touro College where she received an Outstanding Clinical Achievement award. She has 7.5 years of professional experience in orthopedics/ sports rehabilitation utilizing the Mulligan Method, McKenzie Method, and manual therapy with a concentration on pelvic floor, pregnancy, osteoporosis, oncology, and lymphedema rehabilitation. She also is involved in community services, patient education, and has presented lectures at NYU in Brooklyn and the 26thCancer Conference.

Dr. Kimberly Sackheim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at New York University Langone Health and private owner and founder of an office for pain management that will open in August 2019. She has a focus on interventions for spinal issues, joints/tendons, headache and also pelvic pain.  She is board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation with sub-specialties in both pain management and brain injury medicine. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY.  Her fellowship training took place at the Beth Israel Medical Center.  She treats all types of pelvic pain disorders, including pelvic floor dysfunction, rectal pain, headache, jaw pain, along with spine and joint pain.

This is the second of a two-part series. In Part 1, the guests discuss: the kinds of pelvic floor disorders that women can experience; symptoms that patients can present with; whether only women experience pelvic floor problems;  causes of painful symptoms at the pelvic, rectal, or vaginal area and injections available to treat these kinds of pain; extent to which delivering children and growing older influence the occurrence of pelvic floor disorders; if the type of child delivery method, such as vaginal delivery, increases the probability a woman will develop a pelvic floor disorder later in life; how modalities other than surgery, such as physical therapy can contribute to positive outcomes; and the kinds of procedures involved in the administration of pelvic floor physical therapy and the basis on which  various approaches either singly or in combination are best suited for a particular patient?

 

In Part 2, they discuss: Periods of time, such as weeks or months when most rehabilitation interventions take place and whether it ever occurs that further treatment is not associated with additional improvements; if there are instances, such as the presence of a patient’s advanced old age or co-morbidities where watchful waiting may represent the best choice instead of any other kind of intervention; steps that can be taken to lower the percentages of women who experienced urinary incontinence, yet had not talked to a doctor about this problem;  pelvic floor muscle training to treat overactive bladder and who provides it; the role of botulinum toxin as a form of treatment for pelvic floor dysfunctions among elderly patients; extent to which patient education is involved in efforts to improve knowledge of, attitude towards, and practice of pelvic floor muscle exercise; frequency of urinary incontinence symptoms and other pelvic floor disorders among adolescent females; and pelvic floor muscle training as a means of primary prevention of urinary incontinence in asymptomatic women and secondary prevention for women with small muscle strength who are considered dysfunctional, but asymptomatic.

 

Jun 26, 2019

Dr. Olesya Yevdayev is a Senior Physical Therapist in the Outpatient Physical Therapy Department at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. She has a Bachelor of Science degree from Touro College and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Hunter College. She earned her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Touro College where she received an Outstanding Clinical Achievement award. She has 7.5 years of professional experience in orthopedics/ sports rehabilitation utilizing the Mulligan Method, McKenzie Method, and manual therapy with a concentration on pelvic floor, pregnancy, osteoporosis, oncology, and lymphedema rehabilitation. She also is involved in community services, patient education, and has presented lectures at NYU in Brooklyn and the 26thCancer Conference.

Dr. Kimberly Sackheim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at New York University Langone Health and private owner and founder of an office for pain management that will open in August 2019. She has a focus on interventions for spinal issues, joints/tendons, headache and also pelvic pain.  She is board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation with sub-specialties in both pain management and brain injury medicine. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY.  Her fellowship training took place at the Beth Israel Medical Center.  She treats all types of pelvic pain disorders, including pelvic floor dysfunction, rectal pain, headache, jaw pain, along with spine and joint pain.

 

This is the first of a two-part series. In Part 1, the guests discuss: the kinds of pelvic floor disorders that women can experience; symptoms that patients can present with; whether only women experience pelvic floor problems;  causes of painful symptoms at the pelvic, rectal, or vaginal area and injections available to treat these kinds of pain; extent to which delivering children and growing older influence the occurrence of pelvic floor disorders; if the type of child delivery method, such as vaginal delivery, increases the probability a woman will develop a pelvic floor disorder later in life; how modalities other than surgery, such as physical therapy can contribute to positive outcomes; and the kinds of procedures involved in the administration of pelvic floor physical therapy and the basis on which  various approaches either singly or in combination are best suited for a particular patient?

 

In Part 2, they discuss: Periods of time, such as weeks or months when most rehabilitation interventions take place and whether it ever occurs that further treatment is not associated with additional improvements; if there are instances, such as the presence of a patient’s advanced old age or co-morbidities where watchful waiting may represent the best choice instead of any other kind of intervention; steps that can be taken to lower the percentages of women who experienced urinary incontinence, yet had not talked to a doctor about this problem;  pelvic floor muscle training to treat overactive bladder and who provides it; the role of botulinum toxin as a form of treatment for pelvic floor dysfunctions among elderly patients; extent to which patient education is involved in efforts to improve knowledge of, attitude towards, and practice of pelvic floor muscle exercise; frequency of urinary incontinence symptoms and other pelvic floor disorders among adolescent females; and pelvic floor muscle training as a means of primary prevention of urinary incontinence in asymptomatic women and secondary prevention for women with small muscle strength who are considered dysfunctional, but asymptomatic.

 

Jun 12, 2019

Joan Gold is a clinical professor in the Department of Rehabilitation at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. Her areas of specialization include the pediatric disorders cerebral palsy, and spina bifida. In her own words, she stated that she has had the pleasure of watching her patients and learning from their strengths for 45+ years. Her medical degree is from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the NYU Medical Center and her residency in pediatrics at Beth Israel Medical Center. She is board-certified in the following three areas: Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and also Pediatrics. 

This is the second of a two-part series. In this Part 2, she discusses: pregnancy among patients with cerebral palsy, effect of pregnancy on balance and coordination if a motor functional impairment exists; challenges and resources available for patients who become parents; identification of the felt needs of patients; improvements needed in diagnosis and treatment; time period for adoption of rehabilitation treatment innovations; and key topics in rehabilitation research.

In Part 1, Dr. Gold discussed: number of adults in the U.S. with cerebral palsy; their life expectancy; challenges involved in the transition from pediatric to adult care for these patients; kinds of health problems adult patients experience; treatment for dystonia; the impact of additional physical deterioration on quality of life and mental health; and the ability to participate in physical activities, work, family, and recreational activities.

 

May 29, 2019

Joan Gold is a clinical professor in the Department of Rehabilitation at Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health. Her areas of specialization include the pediatric disorders cerebral palsy, and spina bifida. In her own words, she stated that she has had the pleasure of watching her patients and learning from their strengths for 45+ years. Her medical degree is from the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the NYU Medical Center and her residency in pediatrics at Beth Israel Medical Center. She is board-certified in the following three areas: Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and also Pediatrics. 

This is the first of a two-part series. In Part 1, Dr. Gold discusses: number of adults in the U.S. with cerebral palsy; their life expectancy; challenges involved in the transition from pediatric to adult care for these patients; kinds of health problems adult patients experience; treatment for dystonia; the impact of additional physical deterioration on quality of life and mental health; and the ability to participate in physical activities, work, family, and recreational activities.

In Part 2, she discusses: pregnancy among patients with cerebral palsy, effect of pregnancy on balance and coordination if a motor functional impairment exists; challenges and resources available for patients who become parents; identification of the felt needs of patients; improvements needed in diagnosis and treatment; time period for adoption of rehabilitation treatment innovations; and key topics in rehabilitation research.

 

 

 
 
 

 

May 15, 2019

Dr. Joel Stein is Physiatrist-in-Chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, as well as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. His clinical and research interests are in the area of stroke rehabilitation. He has had a particular focus on the use of exercise as a treatment, and on the use of robotic and other technologies to facilitate recovery of motor function after stroke. He has authored or co-authored two books on stroke recovery and rehabilitation for stroke survivors and their families, and edited a multi-authored medical textbook on this subject entitled “Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation.” His undergraduate degree is from Columbia University and his medical degree is from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, followed by a residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He is board certified in both internal medicine and physical medicine & rehabilitation.

This is part 2 of a 2-part series. In this episode, Dr. Stein discusses: measures to predict neurological recovery and stages when they are applied most effectively; periods of time when most rehabilitations interventions take place; success of efforts to achieve the translation of clinical findings and evidence-based research to the bedside in a timely manner; and many other exciting topics.  

 
 
 
 
 

 

May 1, 2019

Dr. Joel Stein is Physiatrist-in-Chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, as well as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. His clinical and research interests are in the area of stroke rehabilitation. He has had a particular focus on the use of exercise as a treatment, and on the use of robotic and other technologies to facilitate recovery of motor function after stroke. He has authored or co-authored two books on stroke recovery and rehabilitation for stroke survivors and their families, and edited a multi-authored medical textbook on this subject entitled “Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation.” His undergraduate degree is from Columbia University and his medical degree is from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, followed by a residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He is board certified in both internal medicine and physical medicine & rehabilitation.

This is part 1 of a 2-part series. In this part of the discussion, Dr. Stein discusses: estimates of stroke incidence and prevalence in the U.S.; stroke occurrence among young individuals; impairments commonly resulting from a stroke; factors such as age that can affect the degree and speed of recovery; sleep apnea as a possible risk factor for stroke; relationship between sleep disorders and stroke recovery and possible contributions to cognitive decline post-stroke; whether screening for post-stroke depression and cognitive impairment can predict long-term patient outcomes; and whether persistent symptoms of anxiety can develop after a stroke.

 

Apr 17, 2019

Dr. Susan Maltser is Director of Cancer Rehabilitation and oversees the comprehensive Cancer Rehabilitation program for Northwell health. She is a practicing physiatrist and an assistant professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Zucker School of Medicine. She also serves as Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Long Island Jewish Hospital. A graduate of the New York College of Osteopathic medicine, her residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation was completed at the Rusk Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center. She is a fellow of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and holds membership in both the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the National Cancer Rehabilitation Physician Consortium.

This interview is a two-part series. In Part 2, Dr. Maltser discusses: the extent of post-surgical care aimed at social and emotional functions; from the perspective of patient-reported outcomes, steps taken to identify the felt needs of patients in conjunction with the needs identified by the health care team; whether demographic factors, such as age influence whether a woman wants to remain in the labor force and what can be done to assist women in this aspect of their lives; the degree to which sexual function affected by breast cancer treatment is discussed with patients; whether older women who undergo treatment for breast cancer are vulnerable to experiencing a balance problem that increases the risk of falling; if technological approaches, such as the development of wearable sensors and cloud-based apps are being used after patients leave the clinical setting to enable them to provide daily feedback on their condition and successes they are experiencing in self-care; and areas where improvements in diagnostic measures and rehabilitation treatment would be warranted.

Apr 3, 2019

Dr. Susan Maltser is Director of Cancer Rehabilitation and oversees the comprehensive Cancer Rehabilitation program for Northwell health. She is a practicing physiatrist and an assistant professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Zucker School of Medicine. She also serves as Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Long Island Jewish Hospital. A graduate of the New York College of Osteopathic medicine, her residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation was completed at the Rusk Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center. She is a fellow of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and holds membership in both the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the National Cancer Rehabilitation Physician Consortium.

This interview is a two-part series. In Part 1, Dr. Maltser discusses:  what cancer rehabilitation is and some conditions that commonly are treated in breast cancer patients; measures employed to assess patients who have undergone breast surgery regarding the scope of rehabilitation interventions to pursue; the adverse effect of reconstructive surgery for breast cancer on shoulder function and the kinds of rehabilitation that prove effective in dealing with this problem; debilitating side effects, such as difficulty sleeping and fatigue, associated with breast cancer surgery; the risk of developing lymphedema after undergoing surgery for breast cancer; the role of self-care in treating lymphedema; and the role that physical exercise might play and when it should occur pre- and post-surgery.

Mar 20, 2019

Dr. Mitchell Elkind is a Professor of neurology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons as well as an attending neurologist in the stroke service at New York Presbyterian Hospital. His areas of expertise are cerebrovascular disease and stroke. He completed his medical school training at Harvard Medical School. His internship was at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA and was followed by a residency in neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital where he served as chief resident. Dr. Elkind subsequently obtained a master’s degree in epidemiology at the Columbia University School of Public Health and also completed fellowship training in cerebrovascular diseases. 

In the second of a two-part Grand Rounds, Dr. Elkind reviews occult atrial fibrillation, monitoring devices, and other relevant areas after which there is a Q&A. 

Mar 6, 2019

Dr. Mitchell Elkind is a Professor of neurology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons as well as an attending neurologist in the stroke service at New York Presbyterian Hospital. His areas of expertise are cerebrovascular disease and stroke. He completed his medical school training at Harvard Medical School. His internship was at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA and was followed by a residency in neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital where he served as chief resident. Dr. Elkind subsequently obtained a master’s degree in epidemiology at the Columbia University School of Public Health and also completed fellowship training in cerebrovascular diseases.  

In Part 1, Dr. Elkind focuses on unexplained stroke and potentially how to prevent it, especially based on some new developments; cryptogenic stroke and embolic stroke of undetermined source; various cardiac sources of stroke and PFO (patent foramen ovale) closure; and how RoPE (Risk of Paradoxical Embolism) scores are used.

Feb 20, 2019

Dr. J.R. Rizzo is a physician scientist at NYU Langone Medical Center’s Rusk Rehabilitation Institute, where he is an Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with a cross-appointment in the Department of Neurology. He leads the Visuomotor Integration Laboratory where his team focuses on eye-hand coordination as it relates to acquired brain injury and the Technology Translation in Medicine Laboratory, where the focus is on assistive technology for the visually impaired and benefits from his own personal experiences with vision loss.  He recently completed an R03 grant through the National Institute of Aging, as a GEMSSTAR Scholar, focusing his research goals on eye-hand coordination in elderly stroke, and is completing a K12 award, as an RMSTP Fellow, focusing on visuomotor integration in brain injury. He has funding at the federal, state, municipal and foundational levels. He has numerous peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, in addition to domestic and international patents filed for his rehabilitation tools. An honors graduate in neuroscience at NYU, hcompleted medical school on scholarship at New York Medical College and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor’s Society Iota Chapter. He completed his residency, including a chief year, at NYU’s Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Program where he subsequently was awarded funding to complete a clinical research fellowship at Rusk.

In the second part of this Grand Rounds presentation Dr. Rizzo continues his description of a pilot research project involving chronic stroke patients who were recruited from outpatient clinics. The investigation included eye tracking while simultaneously recording motion capture of patients’ limbs. He indicates how eye errors correlate with limb errors in this study and mentioned some cognitive implications derived from the project. A question and answer period followed his presentation.

Feb 6, 2019

Dr. J.R. Rizzo is a physician scientist at NYU Langone Medical Center’s Rusk Rehabilitation Institute, where he is an Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with a cross-appointment in the Department of Neurology. He leads the Visuomotor Integration Laboratory where his team focuses on eye-hand coordination as it relates to acquired brain injury and the Technology Translation in Medicine Laboratory, where the focus is on assistive technology for the visually impaired and benefits from his own personal experiences with vision loss.  He recently completed an R03 grant through the National Institute of Aging, as a GEMSSTAR Scholar, focusing his research goals on eye-hand coordination in elderly stroke, and is completing a K12 award, as an RMSTP Fellow, focusing on visuomotor integration in brain injury. He has funding at the federal, state, municipal and foundational levels. He has numerous peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, in addition to domestic and international patents filed for his rehabilitation tools. An honors graduate in neuroscience at NYU, hcompleted medical school on scholarship at New York Medical College and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor’s Society Iota Chapter. He completed his residency, including a chief year, at NYU’s Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Program where he subsequently was awarded funding to complete a clinical research fellowship at Rusk.

In the first part of a grand rounds presentation, Dr. Rizzo discussses eye-hand coordination or what is known as the eye-hand mystique. He describes perception, the ocular motor system, perception to action, and eye-hand control deficits as they relate to visual motor integration. He discusses visual crowding as it pertains to peripheral vision and the importance of material categorization. He also describes research involving chronic stroke patients recruited from outpatient clinics using eye tracking and simultaneously recording motion capture of their actual limbs. The session includes questions from attendees at the presentation and his responses.

In the second part of a grand rounds presentation by Dr. John Ross Rizzo on December 12, 2018 at the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Health, he continued his description of a pilot research project involving chronic stroke patients who were recruited from outpatient clinics. The investigation included eye tracking while simultaneously recording motion capture of patients’ limbs. He indicated how eye errors correlated with limb errors in this study and mentioned some cognitive implications derived from the project. For example, in reaching for a cup of tea there could be an eye movement that has some computational load, meaning what is the cerebral load to complete that task and what is involved if the reaching is done using peripheral vision? In this context, it is worth considering what is occurring in the presence of an impaired brain, such as after a stroke. A central idea is that stroke interferes with cognitive resource sharing between eye and hand movement during eye-hand coordination. A question and answer period followed his presentation.

 
 
 
 
 

 

Jan 23, 2019

Rondel King is a certified strength and conditioning specialist and corrective exercise specialist. His programming aims to bring out the best in a person’s health and performance. He has a strong interest in postural asymmetries and the nervous system as it relates to biomechanics, human performance, and general health. Mr.King leads group fitness classes at NYU Langone Orthopedic Center and is a clinician with the Running Lab and the Golf Lab.

In his interview, Rondel discusses: the relationship between gaining muscle mass versus strength and stability and the topic of weight loss; kinds of patients who can benefit from losing weight; extent of eating disorders; influence of demographic factors on the attainment of successful outcomes; role of diet in weight loss reduction; kinds of lifestyle interventions that prove to be effective in achieving weight loss; role that wearable devices play in contributing to weight loss; whether poor nutrition can be out-trained; if crunches can produce flat abs; whether more sweat burns more calories; effect of running and squats on the knees; if more gym time always is better than less; the notion of No Pain, No Gain; whether yoga can help with back pain; if lifting heavy weights can make women “bulky;" and whether machines are better than free weights.

Jan 9, 2019

Heather Milton leads group fitness classes at NYU Langone Orthopedic Center and is a clinician with the Running Laboratory and Golf Laboratory. She is a board-certified exercise physiologist and strength and conditioning specialist. She is certified in Functional Movement Systems® and by the Titleist Performance Institute. She develops specialized programs to help athletes reach their maximum potential and ability. Ms. Milton creates unique and motivational programs to inspire health and fitness clients and designs injury prevention programs for at-risk athletes and youth sports teams. She also identifies limitations that may affect sport performance, including gait faults in running, swing faults in golf, and swing, kick, and throw patterns in rotational sports. Her undergraduate degree in cardiopulmonary science and her master’s degree in clinical exercise physiology are from Northeastern University.

In this interview, she discusses: kinds of patients who can benefit from building stability, strength, and muscle; measures to assess current physical abilities of patients; conditions where building stability, strength, and muscle can produce a preventive effect; impact of strength training on other abilities, such as improved balance and mobility; influence of demographic factors on the attainment of successful outcomes; the difference between stability and strength; progression of building stability, strength and muscle; difference between strength and mass; key components of a program to build stability, strength, and hypertrophy/muscle mass; common mistakes individuals make in their training programs; whether individuals naturally bulk up; gaining strength and avoidance of adding muscle mass; what to say when efforts to gain muscle for years fail; and who benefits from each type of training.

Dec 26, 2018
David Biderman is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Langone Health and serves as supervisor of the Brain Injury Day Treatment Program. He joined Rusk Rehabilitation, NYU Langone Health in 1996 as a research assistant and started working at the Brain Injury Day Treatment Program in 1999, becoming the supervisor in 2010. A New York City native, he earned his Doctoral Degree in Health Psychology from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Prior to coming to Rusk, he worked in research at other major medical centers in New York. Most recently he has presented and published on the role of significant others in the rehabilitation of individuals with a brain injury. He currently is working on cognitive retraining software to improve attention functions and continues his efforts to educate Brain Injury fellows, Psychology Doctoral Interns, and other professionals interested in learning about the comprehensive neuropsychological rehabilitation of individuals with an acquired brain injury.
 
This discussion includes: assessments performed to determine if cognitive remediation is an appropriate intervention for patients who experienced a traumatic brain injury; aims pursued when engaging in cognitive remediation; the effect of TBI level of severity on kind of treatment and anticipated outcomes; the influence of demographic factors such as age, gender, and race/ethnicity on the attainment of successful outcomes; the role music can play in cognitive remediation; ways in which cognitive remediation could be enhanced through the use of existing and emerging kinds of social media platforms, along with other modalities, such as apps, wearable devices, and virtual reality technology; self- or family caregiver-treatment plans outside the clinical setting;  and current research and proposed studies at NYU aimed at producing a greater understanding of the effectiveness of cognitive remediation kinds of intervention.
 
Dec 12, 2018

Dr. Steven Flanagan is the Chair, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Howard A. Rusk Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Rusk Rehabilitation. He is highly recognized, nationally and internationally, as one of the leading experts in the area of brain injury rehabilitation. He serves on numerous medical advisory boards, including the Brain Trauma Foundation and is a peer reviewer for several scientific journals. He currently is chairperson of the Medical Education Committee and sits on the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Medicine. The author of numerous chapters and peer-reviewed publications, he has received awards from several organizations and been continually listed as one of America’s Top Doctors by Castle Connolly.

Nov 28, 2018
Dr. Kimberly Sackheim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at New York University Langone Medical CenterAs a post-traumatic headache specialist, she has a focus on interventional pain management of chronic headache. She is board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation with sub-specialties in both pain management and brain injury medicine. Her medical degree is from the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Broward General Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale, FL.  Post-doctoral training took place at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. Dr.Sackheim also had an anesthesia-based fellowship in interventional pain medicine, hospice & palliative care at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.
 
In Part 2 of this two part series, she discusses: the extent to which patient health behaviors can be targeted routinely to improve headache management; new headache medications that are effective for treatment; demographic factors that could affect both the degree and the speed of recovery from headaches when they occur; the importance of patient involvement in medical decision-making; use of complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine by patients; the role of in-home telehealth therapy programs; if there is a need for improved diagnostic measures and treatment; and key topics within the realm of rehabilitation research aimed at improving the care of patients who suffer from headaches and any possible emerging areas. 
Nov 14, 2018
Dr. Kimberly Sackheim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at New York University Langone Medical Center. As a post-traumatic headache specialist, she has a focus on interventional pain management of chronic headache. She is board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation with sub-specialties in both pain management and brain injury medicine. Her medical degree is from the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed her residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Broward General Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale, FL.  Post-doctoral training took place at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. Dr.Sackheim also had an anesthesia-based fellowship in interventional pain medicine, hospice & palliative care at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.
 
In Part 1 of this two part series, Dr. Sackheim discusses: headache forecasting models in accurately predicting future headache activity; situations in a patient’s life that serve as useful forecasts of the onset of headache; the degree to which preexisting conditions, such as mood disorders influence the onset of a headache; diagnostic challenges involved when patients present with both headache and neck pain; whether individuals hospitalized due to a head injury are more likely to have a new onset of headaches and a worsening of pre-existing headache and persistent headache; and the role depression and anxiety play in the development of headaches. 

 

 

Oct 31, 2018

Dr. Armando Fuentes recently completed his ARRT fellowship at NYU Rusk Rehabilitation. While doing so, he focused on racial and cultural health disparities in traumatic brain injury. In October 2018, he began working as a clinician at the World Trade Center Survivors Clinic in Elmhurst Hospital, where he hopes to build a culturally informed mental health and clinical training program. He graduated with his PhD in clinical psychology from Fordham University where his research focused on culture, health beliefs, and neurocognition among Latinx patients living with HIV.

In this interview, Dr. Fuentes discusses: his presentation at a Rusk course on October 20 and 21, 2018 to highlight some of the latest evidence in complex TBI rehabilitation; clinical practice guidelines in general and for TBI patients from racial and ethnic groups in particular; outcomes in overall functioning by members of minority groups compared to whites; and lower retention rates in TBI research by Hispanics one to two years post-injury.  

 

 

 
 
 

 

Oct 24, 2018
Tara Denham is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Langone and a Program Manager in Physical Therapy. She is a leading expert in the field of vestibular therapy and is the founder of the Vestibular Physical Therapy Center at Rusk. As an American Physical Therapy Association certified vestibular clinician, she lectures extensively to a wide range of audiences.
 
Joseph Adams is a Senior Physical Therapist and Clinical Instructor of Rehabilitation Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He is a board-certified clinical specialist in Neurologic Rehabilitation with advanced training in Vestibular Rehabilitation. He is a faculty member at Rusk's Neurologic Residency program and also an adjunct professor at Touro College. 
 
Dr. Eva Mihovich is a Senior Psychologist and a clinical instructor at the NYU School of Medicine. She has done research and made professional presentations on the psychological assessment and treatment of vestibular patients. She is an integral part of the multidisciplinary care team at Rusk treating patients with vestibular disorders in individual and group therapy settings.
 
This special interview with these three leaders explores a course on November 3-4, 2018 being offered at Rusk on the topic of vestibular evaluation and treatment of the dizzy patient; the association of vestibular dysfunction associated with certain demographic factors; the contribution of polypharmacy to creating bouts of dizziness; psychological aspects associated with vestibular disorders; conditions besides anxiety that lead to vestibular disorders; common central and peripheral disorders; how patients' lives are affected by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and how this condition is tested for; the extent to which problems involving vestibular systems affect vision; evaluation techniques used in developing treatment plans for patients; the status of clinical practice guidelines and the evidence base for treatments; and current research and proposed studies on the drawing board at Rusk that are aimed at shedding additional light on vestibular disorders. 

 

 

Oct 17, 2018

Dr. Estelle Gallo is a Clinical Specialist at the Rusk Rehabilitation NYU Langone Ambulatory Care Center. She is a certified clinical specialist in Neurology from the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties who specializes in adult neurological rehabilitation. She serves as a faculty member of the accredited physical therapy neurology residency program and holds a faculty position as a Research Assistant Professor in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at NYU School of Medicine. She has received internal funding for her research. Dr. Gallo has published her work in several peer-reviewed journals as well as presented at both national and international conferences. Currently, she is conducting a feasibility and safety study on high level mobility training in patients with non-progressive acquired central neurological injuries.  She also serves as a member of the Locomotor Training Clinical Practice Guidelines Knowledge Translation Task Force for the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy. She received her doctorate degree from New York University. 

In this interview, Dr. Gallo discusses: the ability to run a short distance in the rehabilitation of patients with acquired brain injury; existing evidence to make recommendations about the examination and intervention for high level mobility and to facilitate a return to running; examination techniques and outcome measures that are used; objective criteria used to guide initiation of high-level mobility training; recent developments in clinical practice guidelines on outcome measures for the neurologic population; upcoming recommendations about locomotor training, research being done in the physical therapy department to test the feasibility and safety of high-level mobility training; and some key rehabilitation research topics in physical therapy and some emerging areas. 

 

Oct 10, 2018

Liat Rabinowitz is the Program Manager of Speech Language Pathology at Rusk. Her experience has been in evaluation and treatment of adults with acquired brain injury with a specific area of interest in cognitive communication impairments and working with patients in disorder of consciousness. Most of her current work involves managing the Speech Language Pathology department, along with supervising and training staff. A native of South Africa, she trained as a therapist at the University of Cape Town. Her master’s degree in speech-language pathology is from Columbia University. She currently teaches as an adjunct faculty member at NYU-Steinhardt school on language disorders in adults and has taught cognitive disorders at Columbia University. 

In this interview, she discusses: meaning of the term post-confusional state and kinds of available treatment for it; interventions to treat acquired stuttering; language, cognitive communication, or swallowing disorders associated with the occurrence of a TBI and what can be done from the perspective of speech-language pathology; impairment of conversational ability following a brain injury; key topics within the realm of rehabilitation research in speech-language therapy; and the most common kinds of symptoms involved in post-traumatic amnesia.

 

 

Oct 3, 2018
Dr. Brian Im is the medical director for the NYU Rusk brain injury rehabilitation program and program director for the ACGME accredited brain injury medicine fellowship at NYU School of Medicine. He is heavily involved in program development and academic medicine. He has an active role in TBI research with a focus on studying health care disparities and differences that exist in traumatic brain injury care for different populations. In this interview, Dr. Im discusses some of the medical complexities associated with complex TBI. After completing medical school at SUNY, Syracuse, a rehabilitation residency at NYU School of Medicine/Rusk Rehabilitation, and a fellowship in brain injury medicine at UMDNJ/Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, his subsequent tenure at Bellevue Hospital focused upon an interest in improving brain injury rehabilitation for underserved populations.
 
In Part 2, we discussed: becoming overweight as a risk following a TBI, whether a preexisting endocrine dysfunction can trigger a thyroid dysfunction, gait abnormalities that might stem from a TBI, the status of pharmacological treatment of a brain injury, and research on TBI being conducted at Rusk, along with any system enhancements either underway or being planned.

 

Sep 26, 2018
Dr. Brian Im is the medical director for the NYU Rusk brain injury rehabilitation program and program director for the ACGME accredited brain injury medicine fellowship at NYU School of Medicine. He is heavily involved in program development and academic medicine. He has an active role in TBI research with a focus on studying health care disparities and differences that exist in traumatic brain injury care for different populations. In this interview, Dr. Im discusses some of the medical complexities associated with complex TBI. After completing medical school at SUNY, Syracuse, a rehabilitation residency at NYU School of Medicine/Rusk Rehabilitation, and a fellowship in brain injury medicine at UMDNJ/Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, his subsequent tenure at Bellevue Hospital focused upon an interest in improving brain injury rehabilitation for underserved populations.
 
In Part 1, we discussed: an October 20-21, 2018 program at Rusk on the topic of complex TBI rehabilitation, paths that patients take to arrive at Rusk for treatment, measures used to determine recovery, whether treatment plateaus are reached, and differences in how patients experience a TBI and living with its aftermath.
 
 

 

Sep 19, 2018

Until this interview, this podcast series has focused on healthcare professionals and researchers and the myriad activities in which they all engage. We are very excited that, for this interview, listeners have an opportunity to hear the views of an individual who was on the other side. Mr. Pierre Lucien is an individual who had both legs amputated above the knee. In 2008, while on a training run with the Atlanta, Georgia Police Department, he fell to the ground unconscious when he experienced massive organ failure. In an effort to save his life, doctors had to amputate both of his legs above the knees. He later was transferred to the Rusk Rehabilitation Institute at NYU Langone where he underwent additional surgery and began rehabilitation. Today, he is married and the father of two children and earns a living while employed at a police department in Marietta, Georgia. The interview with him consists of three parts.

In Part 3 we discussed: experience of phantom pain in missing limbs and how to treat it; a sensation of feeling the presence of missing limbs; what he does to stay physically active; his family life and what he does for a living; providing assistance to new patients who undergo an amputation; additional activities in which he is engaged to inspire other individuals to cope with life’s challenges successfully; and thoughts or recommendations important to convey to health professionals.

 

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