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RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine

RUSK Insights on Rehabilitation Medicine is a top podcast featuring interviews with faculty and staff of RUSK Rehabilitation as well as leaders from other rehabilitation programs around the country. These podcasts are being offered by RUSK, one of the top rehabilitation centers in the world. Your host for these interviews is Dr. Tom Elwood. He will take you behind the scenes to look at what is transpiring in the exciting world of rehabilitation research and clinical services through the eyes of those involved in making dynamic breakthroughs in health care.
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Now displaying: October, 2018
Oct 31, 2018

Dr. Armando Fuentes recently completed his ARRT fellowship at NYU Rusk Rehabilitation. While doing so, he focused on racial and cultural health disparities in traumatic brain injury. In October 2018, he began working as a clinician at the World Trade Center Survivors Clinic in Elmhurst Hospital, where he hopes to build a culturally informed mental health and clinical training program. He graduated with his PhD in clinical psychology from Fordham University where his research focused on culture, health beliefs, and neurocognition among Latinx patients living with HIV.

In this interview, Dr. Fuentes discusses: his presentation at a Rusk course on October 20 and 21, 2018 to highlight some of the latest evidence in complex TBI rehabilitation; clinical practice guidelines in general and for TBI patients from racial and ethnic groups in particular; outcomes in overall functioning by members of minority groups compared to whites; and lower retention rates in TBI research by Hispanics one to two years post-injury.  

 

 

 
 
 

 

Oct 24, 2018
Tara Denham is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at NYU Langone and a Program Manager in Physical Therapy. She is a leading expert in the field of vestibular therapy and is the founder of the Vestibular Physical Therapy Center at Rusk. As an American Physical Therapy Association certified vestibular clinician, she lectures extensively to a wide range of audiences.
 
Joseph Adams is a Senior Physical Therapist and Clinical Instructor of Rehabilitation Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He is a board-certified clinical specialist in Neurologic Rehabilitation with advanced training in Vestibular Rehabilitation. He is a faculty member at Rusk's Neurologic Residency program and also an adjunct professor at Touro College. 
 
Dr. Eva Mihovich is a Senior Psychologist and a clinical instructor at the NYU School of Medicine. She has done research and made professional presentations on the psychological assessment and treatment of vestibular patients. She is an integral part of the multidisciplinary care team at Rusk treating patients with vestibular disorders in individual and group therapy settings.
 
This special interview with these three leaders explores a course on November 3-4, 2018 being offered at Rusk on the topic of vestibular evaluation and treatment of the dizzy patient; the association of vestibular dysfunction associated with certain demographic factors; the contribution of polypharmacy to creating bouts of dizziness; psychological aspects associated with vestibular disorders; conditions besides anxiety that lead to vestibular disorders; common central and peripheral disorders; how patients' lives are affected by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and how this condition is tested for; the extent to which problems involving vestibular systems affect vision; evaluation techniques used in developing treatment plans for patients; the status of clinical practice guidelines and the evidence base for treatments; and current research and proposed studies on the drawing board at Rusk that are aimed at shedding additional light on vestibular disorders. 

 

 

Oct 17, 2018

Dr. Estelle Gallo is a Clinical Specialist at the Rusk Rehabilitation NYU Langone Ambulatory Care Center. She is a certified clinical specialist in Neurology from the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties who specializes in adult neurological rehabilitation. She serves as a faculty member of the accredited physical therapy neurology residency program and holds a faculty position as a Research Assistant Professor in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at NYU School of Medicine. She has received internal funding for her research. Dr. Gallo has published her work in several peer-reviewed journals as well as presented at both national and international conferences. Currently, she is conducting a feasibility and safety study on high level mobility training in patients with non-progressive acquired central neurological injuries.  She also serves as a member of the Locomotor Training Clinical Practice Guidelines Knowledge Translation Task Force for the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy. She received her doctorate degree from New York University. 

In this interview, Dr. Gallo discusses: the ability to run a short distance in the rehabilitation of patients with acquired brain injury; existing evidence to make recommendations about the examination and intervention for high level mobility and to facilitate a return to running; examination techniques and outcome measures that are used; objective criteria used to guide initiation of high-level mobility training; recent developments in clinical practice guidelines on outcome measures for the neurologic population; upcoming recommendations about locomotor training, research being done in the physical therapy department to test the feasibility and safety of high-level mobility training; and some key rehabilitation research topics in physical therapy and some emerging areas. 

 

Oct 10, 2018

Liat Rabinowitz is the Program Manager of Speech Language Pathology at Rusk. Her experience has been in evaluation and treatment of adults with acquired brain injury with a specific area of interest in cognitive communication impairments and working with patients in disorder of consciousness. Most of her current work involves managing the Speech Language Pathology department, along with supervising and training staff. A native of South Africa, she trained as a therapist at the University of Cape Town. Her master’s degree in speech-language pathology is from Columbia University. She currently teaches as an adjunct faculty member at NYU-Steinhardt school on language disorders in adults and has taught cognitive disorders at Columbia University. 

In this interview, she discusses: meaning of the term post-confusional state and kinds of available treatment for it; interventions to treat acquired stuttering; language, cognitive communication, or swallowing disorders associated with the occurrence of a TBI and what can be done from the perspective of speech-language pathology; impairment of conversational ability following a brain injury; key topics within the realm of rehabilitation research in speech-language therapy; and the most common kinds of symptoms involved in post-traumatic amnesia.

 

 

Oct 3, 2018
Dr. Brian Im is the medical director for the NYU Rusk brain injury rehabilitation program and program director for the ACGME accredited brain injury medicine fellowship at NYU School of Medicine. He is heavily involved in program development and academic medicine. He has an active role in TBI research with a focus on studying health care disparities and differences that exist in traumatic brain injury care for different populations. In this interview, Dr. Im discusses some of the medical complexities associated with complex TBI. After completing medical school at SUNY, Syracuse, a rehabilitation residency at NYU School of Medicine/Rusk Rehabilitation, and a fellowship in brain injury medicine at UMDNJ/Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, his subsequent tenure at Bellevue Hospital focused upon an interest in improving brain injury rehabilitation for underserved populations.
 
In Part 2, we discussed: becoming overweight as a risk following a TBI, whether a preexisting endocrine dysfunction can trigger a thyroid dysfunction, gait abnormalities that might stem from a TBI, the status of pharmacological treatment of a brain injury, and research on TBI being conducted at Rusk, along with any system enhancements either underway or being planned.

 

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